Author: Adeyemi

Minority nurses were recently advised to pursue higher degrees and embrace faculty positions in their pursuit of excellence, qualitative patient care and promotion of civil society. “Teaching is an advanced practice of nursing,” said Dr. Beverly Malone who keynoted the “Addressing Health Disparities: The Role of Diversified Health Care Providers” said and urged minority nurses to “go back to school and explore every opportunities that could offset their tuition and other school expenses to kick-start their graduate programs before marriage, home-ownership and responsibilities kick-in. “Seven percent of nursing faculty members are minorities. The distribution is not good for minorities in…

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Dr. Titi Abiona, public health physician and lecturer at Obafemi Awolowo University in Ile-Ife, Nigeria was in Chicago recently under the Carnegie Fellowship invitation based on her study on HIV/AIDS infected mothers transmission of the disease to their kids either through breast-feeding or a mixture of infant food with breast-feeding. Tyler Ayodeji, associate editor spoke with her on her research and other issues.  It’s an exciting interview             Inquirer: What are you trying to achieve through this fellowship?             Dr. Titi Abiona: The essence is to receive qualitative data analysis. We are trying to look at the cultural factors…

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Septuagenarian David Olupitan, erstwhile president of United African Organization (UAO), is one of the first African settlers in Chicago. He is revered in City Hall, amongst African immigrants and African American  communities. Here he gives Joseph Omoremi, Editor of The Chicago Inquirer, an exclusive insight into the state of African community in the 60s, genesis of mistrust between African immigrants and African Americans and why the two must work together to solve once and for all, problems plaguing Blacks in the Diaspora.  Except: Inquirer: How has the African community fared since your arrival here in the 60s? Pa Olupitan: In…

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Dr. Christopher Alan Bullock  is the modern day Dr. Martin L. Luther King Jr. Some of the late civil rights leader’s professors also trained Bullock, erstwhile president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), South Side branch and Senior Pastor  Progressive Baptist Church.  He spoke to Joseph Omoremi, editor of The Chicago Inquirer on a number of issues including why he opted out of the Black ministers’  conference. Excepts: Inquirer: Good afternoon Pastor Bullock. Dr. Bullock: Good afternoon, Joseph. I’m glad to have this opportunity to talk with you and I’m excited about the future of…

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Dr. Ewa I. Ewa literarily sets the agenda in the African immigrants community. He co-founded most of the Nigerian and African organizations. In an interview with Joseph Omoremi, editor of The Chicago Inquirer, Dr. Ewa revealed his involvement in so many organization and why African immigrants here must come together as a member of the United African Organization.  Excepts:  Inquirer: Who is Dr. Ewa Ewa per see? Dr. Ewa: Dr. Ewa is from Cross Rivers State of Nigeria. I went to the University of Illinois, Chicago. I read urban planning and public policy at UIC and got a PhD.…

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The Ethiopian Community Association of Chicago (ECAC) has come a long way since its inception in 1984 as the only service provider for Ethiopians in Chicago. It later expanded its coverage to Africans and all immigrants in the city. As of today, it has resettled over 800 refugees and assisted thousands of immigrants to adjust to cultural change. The ECAC’s executive director, Dr. Erku Yimer, counted his blessing and challenges in an interview with the editor of Chicago Inquirer Joseph Omoremi. Excerpts: Inquirer: What is ECAC and what is the basis of your existence? Yimer: We are a community organization…

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Chief Anthony Omotosho, Executive Director, Nigerians in America Political Action Committee (NPAC) was a prominent figure among the groups that campaigned againt the re-election of the then only U.S. Black Senator, Carol Mosley Brown six years back, over her relationship with former Nigeria’s dictator General Sanni Abacha. He bares his mind to Joseph Omoremi, editor of The Chicago Inquirer on why they took up arms with Senator Brown and how some African leaders denied the African community from benefiting from their efforts. It is an exciting reading. Excerpts: Inquirer: It’s been over six years your organization championed the election of…

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The US Senator elect Barrack Obama, has praised the Black Contractors United (BCU) for ensuring that diversity is reflected in the city of Chicago which, he said, guaranteed him the opportunity to forge ahead in his political career and other endeavors. Addressing BCU’s 23rd annual award celebration dubbed “Opportunity Meets Preparedness” at Hyatt Regency Chicago recently, Obama who will be the only Black senator among the 100-man Senate next year, promised to “work hard in Springfield and later Washington DC and partner with businessmen and organizations to ensure that minorities have access to opportunities at city, state and federal levels.”…

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Twenty-three years after Nigerian Breweries (NB), makers of Guilder and Star larger beers, started exporting its products to Europe, the company is making in-roads to North America in July. “Africans are yearning for our product and our desire is to meet their aspirations,” said NB Export Development Manager, Bala Yusuf. There are an estimated six million Nigerians in US. Yusuf was in Chicago last week to court these Africans in readiness for uninterrupted supply of NB products. Already, U.S. has been delineated to seven regional zones with Chicago serving as the Midwest anchor headquarters. Others are New York, Maryland, Atlanta,…

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A 50,000 dollars grant has been given to the Nigerian-American Public/Private Professional Association (NAPPA) to stem the spread of HIV/AIDS in the immigrants’ community as well as increase their knowledge of the disease prevention. Two seminars and a workshop to educate African immigrants are slated between now and June according to NAPPA officials. Already, NAPPA had written letters to 80 community organizations, churches and mosques on the impending HIV/AIDS events and how their members could be tested and educated on the menace of the dreaded disease during their annual picnics and meetings. Besides, NAPPA will be recruiting case managers, counselors…

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